SURVEY – SECLUSION ROOMS

Survey closes February 3, 5 pm

LINK TO SURVEY

BCEdAccess is collecting a quick snapshot of information about seclusion in BC schools, from parents and guardians of children and youth with disabilities, and school staff. We recognize this may be a triggering topic for folks and we ask you to prepare yourselves to engage with it. Please reach out if you need support and we’ll help you connect with someone.

It’s a very short survey, 15 questions. We’re looking for information about seclusion rooms to show their prevalence.

The survey will close February 3 at 5 pm. As always if you see errors or have questions, let us know!

WHAT AND WHO IS THIS SURVEY FOR?
This survey is for:
-Parents and guardians of students with disabilities, neurodivergence and/or complex needs
-Education staff

Who have witnessed seclusion rooms, and/or children being secluded in the British Columbia education system IN THE PAST 5 YEARS.

BCEdAccess is seeking a ‘snapshot’ of numbers of seclusion rooms or spaces, and how common the use of seclusion rooms and seclusion are in the BC education system. SURVEY CLOSES FEB 3 AT 5 PM
*Seclusion: Involuntary confinement of a person alone in a room, enclosure or space which the person is physically prevented from leaving.

****We understand that this topic can be very triggering. Please take a moment before to prepare your heart. We also suggest that you make a plan for after for self-care and/or check in with a loved one to decompress. ****

WHAT WILL THE DATA BE USED FOR?

The data collected here will be used to create a series of reports and discussions. We want to be able to show policy makers, and the general public up to date information about this ongoing issue in our education system.

Inclusion BC has conducted detailed surveys on this topic in both 2013 and 2017
https://inclusionbc.org/our-campaigns/stop-hurting-kids/
and they continue to pursue resolution today.

The report will be a snapshot of the previous 5 years in the education system and will be used to highlight some of the issues and practices that may lead to student trauma from the perspective of parents and guardians, and staff who have witnessed these events. The overarching anonymous data will be shared with other advocacy organizations, Districts and School Boards, the Ministry of Education, and media.

Your email address will be collected as a method of validating your identity as a human and an individual, BUT WILL NOT BE ASSOCIATED WITH THE DATA WHEN SHARED WITH THE REPORT. You will not be added to any mailing lists unless you opt in below to the BCEdAccess mailing list, and your contact information WILL NOT be shared in any way. All emails except those who opted in to the mailing list will be deleted from any records we may have upon publishing of the survey report. Individual responses WILL NOT be given to any third party. Text responses may be shared in the report as standalone quotes if identifying information is not contained within them. *Please make sure to not include names of individuals.

WHO IS BCEdAccess?
BCEdAccess, as an organization of parents, guardians and allies in British Columbia, supports the rights of children and youth who have disabilities, are neurodivergent and/or have complex learning needs, to achieve equitable access to a quality education in accordance with international human rights law, and full inclusion and participation in their schools and communities.

BCEdAccess began as a grassroots volunteer advocacy organization in 2014, and is now the BCEdAccess Society, a non-profit, charitable organization.

Learn more and support our organization here: https://bcedaccess.com
If you would like to contact us please email: info@bcedaccess.com

COMPLETING THE SURVEY IMPLIES THAT YOU AGREE TO THE USE OF THE DATA AS DESCRIBED ABOVE.

 Contact us: info@bcedaccess.com

1 thought on “SURVEY – SECLUSION ROOMS”

  1. I worked for many years with children with challenges in the school system here in BC. We used quiet rooms for kids who had rage problems. It was always used as a last resort for the safety of both the students themselves and those around them. We never just put a student in one and walked away. Once they calmed down we would talk about what was causing them to act out. Then try to show them a better way to express themselves.

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